Yes, Victoria, There Is Such A Thing As A Pinkopotamus

I’d like to officially invite all the pink animals of the world to come live at my house. I am totally in love with this pink dolphin who lives in to Lake Calcasieu, an inland saltwater estuary in Louisiana:

Pink Dolphin

Pink Dolphin

And I totally admire the shocking pink of this katydid, although bugs are not my favorite.

Pink Katydid

Pink Katydid

But to now have a pink hippo! Well, let’s just say it can’t get better than that.

Rare Pink Hippopotamus

Rare Pink Hippopotamus

This little darling was spotted by British wildlife photographers Will and Mathew Burrard-Lucas in early September as they cruised around Kenya’s Masai Mara game preserve, hoping to capture images of the world-famous wildebeest migration. (Why?) Presumably, now that they have discovered the wonder that is HIPPO, they will now stop haunting the poor wildebeests and start shooting more hippo pics.

The brothers were breakfasting along the banks of the Mara River when the little pink patooty bumbled out the other side. Of course they grabbed their cameras and started shooting.

Little Pinkopotamus is not an albino, as you may think. Her pink skin is caused by a condition called leucism, a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation. Albino animals have no pigment whatsoever.

The brothers wrote:

“Being an animal that is so strikingly different often results in a hard life; these creatures frequently become outcasts, rejected by their conventionally colored peers. In this case however, we were relieved to note that the other hippos seemed to be treating the pink hippo just like any other.”

Well, of course Little Pinkopotamus is being treated well. Hippos are highly advanced creatures, capable of great love and affection. Maybe when she grows up, we can introduce her to Svetik, a Russian pink hippo that I’ve written about before.