Peruvian Hippopotamus Soapstone Figurine

It’s a running joke in our family that my grasp of world geography is tenuous at best. Although I certainly know where South America is (duh, it’s just below North America), I’m not sure I could name very many of its countries. However, I have heard of Peru, mostly because I studied Art History in college and remember seeing the Incan monuments in my text book. You know, I always suspected that my art degree would come in handy some day. Read this and weep, Dad!

But the bigger question is: are there any hippos in Peru? And I have the answer, because I just Googled it and found out that yes there ARE hippos in Peru! And they speak Spanish. Or possibly Peruvian. They all live in zoos though, not in the wild. Bummer for them.

Like people all around the world, in many countries that I cannot name, the people of Peru love hippos. How do I know this? Because I have just ordered some hippos sculptures created by Peruvian artisans to sell here at Hippo Mojo. These figurines are hand-carved from soapstone and measure about 3″ long. The sales literature that came with these hippos describes Peru as a country known for its natural abundance of rocks, stones and minerals, which I already knew, because aren’t those Incan ruins built up in the mountains on rocks? Why, yes they are. (Again, that Art History degree is super useful.)

The sculptures are fair trade imported. What does this mean? Here’s what I found out: “Fair Trade focuses more on paying artisans a fair price transforming the lives of poor artisans, and helping them to gain the necessary knowledge and skills to develop their businesses and work their way out of poverty.” Hmm, this sounds familiar. Did these artisans major in Art History also?

Peruvian Hippopotamus Soapstone Figurine

Peruvian Hippopotamus Soapstone Figurine

Peruvian Hippopotamus Soapstone Figurine

Peruvian Hippopotamus Soapstone Figurine

If you’d like to buy one of these hippos and help a starving artist out of poverty, I would really appreciate it. I mean, the people of Peru would be grateful. And it would totally make that art degree worthwhile.